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Expert insights from UArizona Health Sciences

Cancer

Caroline Berger
Caroline Berger is a wife, mother, grandmother, University of Arizona Health Sciences employee – and a breast cancer survivor of 16 years. She shares her journey and why it’s so important to trust yourself and find advocates.
Lisa Quale
Mobile applications can’t replace doctors, but they can be useful tools if you want to take a proactive approach to skin care.
Kirsten Limesand, PhD
Most people don’t think about saliva. But imagine your life without it.
Lisa Quale
The sun gives us light and life, but it is also one of the world’s top causes of cancer because of the daily exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light it provides.
Ariel Shirley
As a public health student, I have the unique perspective of incorporating Diné philosophies with holistic wellness to address chronic health issues. One example is using my culture to connect with running.
Brittany L. Forte
What lacks a brain but has the ability to swiftly avoid setting off our body’s intruder detectors, bringing its own blueprints into our cells to make more of itself, and in some cases, cause cancer? Human papillomavirus.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
In 2013, Academy Award-winning actress Angelina Jolie wrote a now famous opinion piece for the New York Times detailing her journey involving genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer.
University of Arizona Cancer Center
Most people familiar with cancer treatment know of three main options: surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. But a newer option, called immunotherapy, is creating quite a buzz across the cancer community.
University of Arizona Cancer Center
Historically, the most important risk factors for head and neck cancer — which can strike anywhere from the lips to the larynx, and up into the sinuses and nasal cavity — consisted of alcohol use, tobacco use (including smokeless tobacco), poor oral hygiene and missing teeth.
Cynthia A Thomson PhD, RD
Cancer is expected to exceed cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in Arizona within the next 20 years.

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