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Expert insights from UArizona Health Sciences

Children and Family Health

Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
Most commonly, asthma manifests itself as having difficulty breathing, accompanied by any number of other symptoms, including, chest pain or tightness, anxiety, fast heart rate, cough, throat irritation and/or wheezing.
University of Arizona Cancer Center
Most people familiar with cancer treatment know of three main options: surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. But a newer option, called immunotherapy, is creating quite a buzz across the cancer community.
University of Arizona Cancer Center
Historically, the most important risk factors for head and neck cancer — which can strike anywhere from the lips to the larynx, and up into the sinuses and nasal cavity — consisted of alcohol use, tobacco use (including smokeless tobacco), poor oral hygiene and missing teeth.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
Epilepsy is the fourth most-common neurological disorder in adults, and the most common neurological condition in children. About 1 in 26 people will develop epilepsy over the course of their lifetime.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Precision medicine uses data on an individual's person’s diet, exercise routine, family history, environment, genetics, and more to tailor treatment and prevention of certain conditions to that person’s unique characteristics.
Michelle Kahn-John, PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC, GNP
Moving toward a more progressive and culturally relevant approach to Native American health care, Indian Health Services and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services require culturally sensitive care in health-care settings.
University of Arizona College of Nursing
Lois Loescher, PhD, RN, FAAN
Dr. Lois Loescher is acutely aware of the vital importance of sun safety.
Terry A. Badger, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN
Caring for a loved one with a cancer diagnosis can influence every aspect of a family's quality of life.
Will Humble, MPH
Good oral health is more than just a nice smile. Having good oral health improves a person’s ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew and eat. 
Elizabeth Knight, PhD, DNP, FNP-C
The start of a new school year can only mean one thing: fall sports season is here.

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