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Expert insights from UArizona Health Sciences

Healthy Communities

University of Arizona Health Sciences
There are many ways to protect yourself against flu, such as avoiding close contact with people who are sick, washing your hands, and avoiding touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
Kelly Palmer, MHS, CCRP
You are likely familiar with type 2 diabetes, the most common form, but what do you know about prediabetes?
Ariel Shirley
As a public health student, I have the unique perspective of incorporating Diné philosophies with holistic wellness to address chronic health issues. One example is using my culture to connect with running.
Andrew W. Gardner, PhD, BCBA-D
As of 2018, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects one in 59 births in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with ASD have difficulty with social communication and interaction, restricted interests, and repetitive behaviors.
Anna G. Figueroa
Brian S. McKay, PhD
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in individuals over age 55 in developed nations and more than 10 million people in the United States have AMD, according to the Foundation Fighting Blindness.
Brittany L. Forte
What lacks a brain but has the ability to swiftly avoid setting off our body’s intruder detectors, bringing its own blueprints into our cells to make more of itself, and in some cases, cause cancer? Human papillomavirus.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
Coccidioidomycosis, or “cocci” for short, is the medical term for Valley fever, an infectious disease that affects thousands of people in Arizona every year.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
Most commonly, asthma manifests itself as having difficulty breathing, accompanied by any number of other symptoms, including, chest pain or tightness, anxiety, fast heart rate, cough, throat irritation and/or wheezing.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
There is power in numbers. When a researcher is studying the causes of a human disease, the more people involved in the study, the greater the probability that the study will generate useful results.
University of Arizona Cancer Center
Historically, the most important risk factors for head and neck cancer — which can strike anywhere from the lips to the larynx, and up into the sinuses and nasal cavity — consisted of alcohol use, tobacco use (including smokeless tobacco), poor oral hygiene and missing teeth.

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