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Expert insights from UArizona Health Sciences

Prevention

Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
In 2013, Academy Award-winning actress Angelina Jolie wrote a now famous opinion piece for the New York Times detailing her journey involving genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, PharmB
There is power in numbers. When a researcher is studying the causes of a human disease, the more people involved in the study, the greater the probability that the study will generate useful results.
University of Arizona Cancer Center
Historically, the most important risk factors for head and neck cancer — which can strike anywhere from the lips to the larynx, and up into the sinuses and nasal cavity — consisted of alcohol use, tobacco use (including smokeless tobacco), poor oral hygiene and missing teeth.
Valerie Schaibley, PhD
Precision medicine uses data on an individual's person’s diet, exercise routine, family history, environment, genetics, and more to tailor treatment and prevention of certain conditions to that person’s unique characteristics.
Cynthia A Thomson PhD, RD
Cancer is expected to exceed cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in Arizona within the next 20 years.
Alison Sutton-Ryan
As the new semester begins, there is much excitement and anticipation—and often much stress.
University of Arizona College of Nursing
Lois Loescher, PhD, RN, FAAN
Dr. Lois Loescher is acutely aware of the vital importance of sun safety.
F. Mazda Shirazi, MD, PhD, FACEP, FAAEM
With the advent of warm weather the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center is reminding people of the dangers of rattlesnakes.
Wanda F. Moore
As an African American woman, I am aware that I’m in one of the highest-risk groups for dying from heart disease but my non-inherited risk factors are manageable.
Charles Katzenberg, MD
When it comes to decisions of the heart, February can be a complicated month.

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