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The Tucson Continuing Medical Education (CME) Conference

Mar
13
8:00 am to 12:00 pm
Promo of Tucson CME conference with session descriptions

Banner Health and Tucson Medical Center are proud to support the ongoing education of healthcare providers in Southern Arizona by hosting the 2021 Tucson Continuing Medical Education Conference, featuring experts from around UArizona Health Sciences and main campus. 

The 2021 Conference will feature an opening keynote by Lindsey R. Baden, MD, a principal investigator of the Moderna vaccine trial and infectious disease specialist at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center.

Additional experts will lead panel discussions about the social determinants of health and the impact of Coronavirus on underserved communities. In a series of breakout sessions, participants will have the opportunity to learn more about coronavirus, advanced lung disease, dementia, heart failure and joint replacement.

The event will take place virtually on Saturday, March 13 from 8 a.m. until noon.

Event registration is $20, and includes 4 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Christian Bime, MD, MSC
Christian Bime, MD, MSC
Associate Professor, Medicine
UArizona Department of Medicine

Within a year, the disease caused by the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has produced a worldwide pandemic with millions of patients presenting with severe acute respiratory failure from COVID-19-induced ARDS and many dying from subsequent multi-organ system failure. Antiviral therapy for this novel virus is limited to Remdesivir and therapies to dampen inflammatory responses are limited. There are numerous studies exploring various therapeutic options to limit the dysregulated inflammatory responses and dysregulated coagulopathy associated with severe COVID-19 disease. In terms of supportive care, patients with COVID-19 associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) present unique challenges. This presentation will review current management strategies for patients with severe COVID-19.  

Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD
Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD
Director, UArizona Center for Innovation in Brain Science
University of Arizona Health Sciences

Currently, there are no therapeutics to delay or treat Alzheimer’s disease. Current therapies target symptoms with limited advocacy and duration. This presentation will review the current status of the therapeutic landscape for Alzheimer’s disease with a focus on therapies that target underlying mechanisms of disease and innovative approaches to regenerate the degenerated Alzheimer’s disease brain. Further, this presentation will provide a foundation upon which clinicians could evaluate clinical trials and potential therapeutic avenues for treating Alzheimer’s disease.

Elizabeth B. Juneman, MD
Elizabeth B. Juneman, MD
Associate Professor, Medicine
UArizona Department of Medicine, Sarver Heart Center

About 6.2 million adults in the United States have heart failure. Heart failure costs the nation over $32 billion per year. Today, because of a growing and aging population, the total number of heart failure patients still continues to rise. Despite advancement in medical therapies for heart failure, there is a relative increase incidence in the relatively young, possibly related to an increase in obesity. This presentation will address the epidemiological trends of heart failure and review guideline based medical and mechanical therapies for heart failure with a focus on new updates. 

Mindy Fain, MD
Mindy Fain, MD
Professor, Medicine; Chief, Division of Geriatrics, General Internal Medicine and Palliative Medicine; Co-Director, University of Arizona Center on Aging
UArizona Department of Medicine, Center on Aging

Since May 2020, increased attention has been directed to people with COVID-19 whose symptoms have persisted for longer than four weeks. The estimate is that one in ten patients have symptoms for 12 weeks or longer and these patients suffer different complications from this complex disease. There is emerging knowledge of how to identify, assess and many of these patients with Long COVID, and many practitioners would benefit from up-to-date information. This presentation will improve PCP knowledge of Long COVID, and their confidence in management and referral. 

Monica Kraft, MD
Monica Kraft, MD
Professor and Chair, Medicine; Deputy Director, UArizona Health Sciences Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center
University of Arizona Health Sciences

The differential diagnosis of shortness of breath, cough, and wheeze is broad and can include other non-pulmonary diagnoses. This presentation will review the early identification of symptoms and signs that suggest lung disease and when to refer to a pulmonary specialist and what evaluation is required to determine the cause of shortness of breath, cough and chest tightness. 

Francisco Moreno, MD
Francisco Moreno, MD
Professor, Psychiatry; Associate VP, Diversity and Inclusion.
University of Arizona Health Sciences

Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put many people from racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19. Differences in health care access, educational opportunities, social support, and financial resources have directly and indirectly influenced overall health outcomes. Inequities in the social determinants of health, such as poverty and healthcare access, affecting these groups are interrelated and influence a wide range of health and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. This presentation with highlight the need for clinician and health care policymakers to remove these barriers to achieve health equity so that everyone has a fair opportunity to be healthy. 

Michael Worobey, PhD
Michael Worobey, PhD
Department Head, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Arizona

Genomic epidemiology is one of the most powerful tools for combatting SARS-CoV-2. Despite this, many physicians are unfamiliar with this field of knowledge. This presentation will describe the field using the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 in Europe and North America as a case study. 

To request any disability-related accommodations for this event please contact the event coordinator at least three business days prior to the event.
CME Credit/Disclaimer: 

Accreditation Statement:

The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson designates this live activity for a maximum of 4.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Disclosure Statement(s):

All Faculty, CME Planning Committee Members and the CME Office Reviewers have disclosed that they have no financial relationships with commercial interests that would constitute a conflict of interest concerning this CME activity.

Mar
13
8:00 am to 12:00 pm
Saturday, March 13, 2021 - 8:00am

AUDIENCE

Faculty, Students, Alumni, Community
University of Arizona Health Sciences

LOCATION

Virtual

CONTACT

Ross Dubois
College of Medicine – Tucson