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Health Sciences In The Media

  • New Delhi Times - Oct. 19

    Milk drinking in America has fallen by 40% since 1975. But its production and consumption has risen by 9%. The article references a study published in Nutritional Reviews in February 2020 by Elizabeth Jacobs, PhD, and colleagues from the University of Arizona College of Public Health in Tucson. The researchers recommend milk be downgraded as a separate and essential food. Dr. Jacobs says it should be placed in a much lower category as one of many foods that could provide protein.

  • Fry's grocery stores is no longer sanitizing shopping carts for customers. Instead, the stores are providing sanitizing wipes for customers to do it themselves. "Obviously shopping carts are one of those things that a high number of people are going to be touching," Dr. Sahd Marvasti from the University of Arizona College of Medicine said. "But if I had to choose between whether or not masks were required versus universal sanitizing, I would choose masks."

  • The number of new weekly COVID-19 cases in Arizona recently rose to its highest point since the first week in August. "What's happening here in Arizona, it's more like a slow boil," said Joe Gerald, an associate professor with the University of Arizona's Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. "It's not like what we're seeing in other parts of the country, like North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin. Those states look like Arizona did in June, where there's this rapid uptick."

  • Hindustan Times - Oct. 16

    Immunity against Covid-19 may persist for at least five months after being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a study led by an Indian-origin researcher in the US. We clearly see high-quality antibodies still being produced five to seven months after infection,” said Deepta Bhattacharya, associate professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson.

  • CNN - Oct. 16

    Several new reports published recently show Covid-19 immunity can last for months. Researchers from the University of Arizona Health Sciences found antibodies that protect against infection can last for at least five to seven months after a Covid-19 infection. Interview with Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunobiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

  • CBC Radio - Oct. 16

    A Canadian researcher has found that the virus that causes COVID-19 can hijack a pain receptor on our cells, using it to get into the cell, but also blocking its ability to signal pain. Interview with Rajesh Khanna, a professor of pharmacology at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy.

  • With many kids in our area starting hybrid learning, parents have more questions about how COVID-19 affects children. While coronavirus is commonly known as a lung issue, the American Heart Association said it can involve the heart as well. In fact, Dr. Nancy Sweitzer, director of the Sarver Heart Center at the University of Arizona, is currently focusing on myocarditis in children, which can cause severe chest pain and inflammation of the heart.

  • Chlorine disinfection is used by the majority of drinking water treatment municipalities to control microbial pathogens. Kelly Reynolds, professor and environmental microbiologist at the University of Arizona College of Public Health and Director of the Environment, Exposure Science and Risk Assessment Center, writes about emerging microbes that exhibit chlorine resistance.

  • University of Arizona Heath Sciences researchers developed one of the most accurate COVID-19 antibody tests available and now have shown antibodies persist for months after infection, providing long-term immunity.

  • CNN - Oct. 14

    Three new reports show coronavirus immunity can last for months -- and maybe even longer. The findings suggest that many, if not most, people who recover from coronavirus infections are protected for at least a period of time. One study found that people produce antibodies that protect against infection and last for at least five to seven months. "We have one person that is seven months out. We have a handful of people that are five to seven months out," Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunobiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, told CNN.

  • The question of how long immunity lasts against COVID-19 is one step closer to being answered, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Arizona Health Sciences. Deepta Bhattacharya, associate professor and immunologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson is interviewed.

  • A new study published yesterday by scientists at the University of Arizona Health Sciences shows antibodies to the coronavirus disease last for at least five months after infection.

  • Hindustan Times - Oct. 14

    Immunity against Covid-19 may persist for at least five months after being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a study led by an Indian-origin researcher in the US. The researchers from the University of Arizona Health Sciences studied the production of antibodies from a sample of nearly 6,000 people infected with the novel coronavirus. 

  • NewsNation - Oct. 14

    The question of how long immunity lasts against COVID-19 is one step closer to being answered, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Arizona Health Sciences studied the production of antibodies from a sample of nearly 6,000 people and found immunity lasts for at least several months after being infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

  • Should you or your guests fly? Should you take that likely much-needed vacation or push it to the equally uncertain future? Is air travel really that risky? To find out, The Show spoke with Paloma Beamer, associate professor in the College of Public Health at the University of Arizona. She’s an exposure scientist, who studies how people are exposed to disease — and designs ways for people to avoid it.

  • After a dismal year for the airline industry because of the coronavirus pandemic, some carriers are emphasizing enhanced health and safety measures in a bid to lure back travelers in time for the holidays. "You're in a contained tube for a number of hours. So I think people who are higher-risk for whatever reason need to be wary about whether the travel is essential or not," said Dr. Shad Marvasti with the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

  • As President Trump recovers from COVID-19 and travels around the country for campaign events he has said that he is now possibly immune. Dr. Shad Marvasti at the University of Arizona College of Medicine talks about what we know and what we have learned about the coronavirus and immunity.

  • KFYI-AM Phoenix - Oct. 13

    A study from the University of Arizona Health Sciences study shows COVID-19 antibodies provide lasting immunity.

  • UPI - Oct. 13

    People sickened with COVID-19 produce "high-quality" antibodies against the virus five to seven months after they become infected, according to an analysis published Tuesday by the journal Immunity. The findings suggest that those infected with the new coronavirus potentially can develop long-lasting immunity to it, researchers from the University of Arizona Health Sciences said.

  • COVID-19 patients may produce antibodies for at least five months after initial infection, according to a study published in the journal Immunity. Researchers at the University of Arizona Health Sciences in Tucson analyzed antibody production from 5,882 blood samples collected in Arizona's Pima County as part of a larger effort to create and validate a COVID-19 antibody test.

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