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Health Sciences In The Media

  • Many individuals recovering from COVID-19 are experiencing lingering symptoms that can last for weeks. One post-viral symptom is something called "brain fog." Dr. Shad Marvasti, an associate professor and director of public health and prevention curriculum at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix, explains the symptoms of brain fog.

  • Many individuals recovering from COVID-19 are experiencing lingering symptoms that can last for weeks. One post-viral symptom is something called "brain fog." Dr. Shad Marvasti, an associate professor and director of public health and prevention curriculum at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix, explains the symptoms of brain fog.

  • Dr. Victoria Maizes, executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona, discusses the “prescribing cascade” and the health risks to older adults who take multiple medications to treat different chronic conditions.

  • The 2020 University of Arizona Arthritis Center “Bear Down for Health: Sport and Science in the Era of COVID-19” livestream panel discussion and reception is Sept. 16 at 11 a.m.

     

  • John Galgiani, head of the University of Arizona’s Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is heading up vaccine research at the center and believes the vaccine shown to prevent valley fever in mice should be available for dogs, which also get infected in large numbers.

     

  • The Atlantic - Sep. 8

    Many health experts say the health risk of casting an in-person ballot is relatively low. In a risk-assessment chart co-created by Saskia Popescu, an epidemiologist at the University of Arizona, voting would go in the same low-medium risk category as playing golf or tennis.

     

  • Efforts are underway to bring to market a vaccine for a fungal infection that occurs in the deserts of the Southwest. Dr. John Galgiani, director of the University of Arizona's Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is heading up vaccine research there and believes the vaccine shown to prevent valley fever in mice should be available for dogs, which also get infected in large numbers, as soon as next year.

     

  • Historically, older adults have been underrepresented in clinical trials for certain treatments. But with the coronavirus, experts say it is critical that older adults be included in vaccine trials since the virus can impact them at higher rates. Dr. Shad Marvasti, an associate professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, said medical research has been mostly limited to a certain demographic – specifically, "middle aged white men."

     

  • The University of Arizona Arthritis Center's "Bear Down for Health: Sport and Science in the Era of COVID-19" livestream panel discussion and reception will take place on Sept. 16. Special guests include Dave Heeke, Dr. Daniel Derksen and Dr. Janko Nikolich-Zugich.

     

  • An article examines the number of positive COVID-19 cases at each of the three state universities. Dr. Shad Marvasti, director of public health and prevention at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, is interviewed.

     

  • Science Alert - Sep. 5

    Continuing coverage: Dr. Elizabeth Connick, an immunolobiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucon said that she doesn't disinfect and wash food packages, frozen or otherwise. "I did that for about a week, then decided there would be more cases if the virus was transmitted that way. I don't think there is a lot of virus hanging around on those packages," Connick said.

     

  • With the coronavirus spreading through colleges at alarming rates, universities are scrambling to find quarantine locations in dormitory buildings and off-campus properties to isolate the thousands of students who have caught COVID-19 or been exposed to it. Joe Gerald, an associate professor of public health policy and management at the University of Arizona, said the idea of identifying cases, contact tracing and quarantining is the right approach. He said it's just going to be hard to do in dorms, frat houses or places where students congregate.

     

  • Dr. Shad Marvasti, an associate professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, said Memorial Day weekend was a disaster in terms of the pandemic. “We paid the price for it when we saw the increase in the number of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in Arizona. Hopefully, we’ve grown wiser and more sober from the realities of COVID-19.”

     

  • Efforts are underway to bring to market a vaccine for a fungal infection that occurs in the deserts of the Southwest. With recent studies showing promise, there is a renewed push. Dr. John Galgiani, director of the University of Arizona's Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is heading up vaccine research there and believes the vaccine shown to prevent valley fever in mice should be available for dogs, which also get infected in large numbers, as soon as next year.

  • With a holiday weekend upon us, Dr. Shad Marvasti, with the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix says Arizonans are going to have to continue wearing masks and physical distancing, so the state can avoid another big spike in COVID-19 cases.

  • For Eddie Case, his battle with COVID-19 didn't end when he went home from the hospital. In March, his symptoms were so severe he had to spend 20 days in a medically-induced coma. Six months later, he said his life isn't the same. "People have fatigue and confusion, difficulty focusing and concentrating," said Dr. Shad Marvasti, director of public health for the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

  • Dr. Ole Thienhaus, chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, discusses the combined impact of long-term extreme heat and a pandemic on mental health. 

  • Efforts are underway to bring to market a vaccine for a fungal infection that occurs in the deserts of the Southwest. With recent studies showing promise, there is a renewed push. Dr. John Galgiani, director of the University of Arizona's Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is heading up vaccine research there and believes the vaccine shown to prevent valley fever in mice should be available for dogs, which also get infected in large numbers, as soon as next year. A veterinary vaccine company, Anivive, is developing it. "It's very promising," said Galgiani.

  • Your Valley - Sep. 2

    In honor of Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan’s 25th anniversary as director of the Steele Children’s Research Center at the University of Arizona, members of the Phoenix Women’s Board of the Steele Children's Research Center have contributed $5 million to establish an endowment in his name. The endowment celebrates and honors Ghishan for his life’s work to improve treatment and seek cures for childhood diseases.

  • "We don't have anywhere near the population exposed, infected or recovered or somehow immunized to COVID-19 yet. We're not going to get to herd immunity until many more people are exposed to the virus or if we have a vaccine which will enable more people to get immunity," said Dr. Shad Marvasti, director of public health for the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

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