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Health Sciences In The Media

  • While COVID-19 vaccines are proven to be effective, it is still unclear if a booster shot will be needed after the initial doses. Dr. Shad Marvasti with the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix says it depends on immunity response. “We don’t know ultimately how long the immunity will last from the vaccine. We know that it’s going to be at least three months, if not, maybe six months, potentially up to a year," Marvasti said.

  • Sleep Junkie - Mar. 2

    Interview with Dr. Michael Grandner, Director of the Sleep and Health Research Program at the University of Arizona and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson.

  • The University of Arizona College of Nursing recently expanded its program. Connie Miller, a clinical associate professor, is interviewed.

  • Columnist Joanna Allhands interviews medical experts about COVID-19 recovery. "When we say 'recovered,' it's in terms of how likely you are to transmit the virus to others," said Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine –Tucson. 

  • The COVID-19 vaccine is a powerful tool, but doctors still urge caution. The vaccine is effective at preventing severe illness from coronavirus, but it's unclear how it impacts transmission. "Being vaccinated means you're at low risk, not no risk, and so we still should be mindful of the most high-risk activities like indoor dining, large public gatherings," said Joe Gerald, an associate professor in the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health.

  • Experts say low-income seniors of color face many obstacles that are preventing them from getting a COVID-19 vaccination. A mobile vaccine program, run between the University of Arizona College of Public Health's Phoenix campus and Maricopa County, is aimed at reducing some of the glaring inequities in the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine among seniors that have become increasingly evident in Arizona.

  • Millions of people in the U.S. are drinking water that fails to meet federal health standards, including by violating limits for dangerous contaminants. Latinos are disproportionately exposed, according to the Guardian's review of more than 140,000 public water systems across the U.S. and county-level demographic data. Paloma Beamer, an exposure science researcher at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, found that most Latino residents in Nogales, Arizona, thought that drinking tap water was as unsafe as drinking alcohol and driving, and more detrimental to their health than smoking.

  • The Hill - Feb. 26

    In an editorial, University of Arizona College of Medicine virologists Felicia Goodrum Sterling and James Alwine, write: It is essential that until we meet vaccination goals, we must remain vigilant with masking, distancing, avoiding crowds and hand hygiene to contain the spread of variants until enough are vaccinated to control the pandemic.

  • Researchers at the University of Arizona Health Sciences received a $1.5 million grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to study the effects of stress and the risk of cancer and reproductive health issues in female firefighters. 

  • USA Today - Feb. 25

    Experts say low-income seniors of color face many obstacles that are preventing them from getting a COVID-19 vaccination. A mobile vaccine program, run between the University of Arizona College of Public Health's Phoenix campus and Maricopa County, is aimed at reducing some of the glaring inequities in the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine among seniors that have become increasingly evident in Arizona.

  • Dr. Dan Derksen, director of the University of Arizona Center for Rural Health, said Arizona appears to be back on track. “As we get more vaccinations done, and as people continue to take care of themselves by wearing masks, social distancing, and the other things that we have been trying to do for some time, we need to continue those because we are still in the first phase of immunizations and we really need to get those vaccinations to the general public,” said Derksen.

  • Dr. Shad Marvasti, director of public health, prevention and health promotion at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, said disparities in the COVID-19 vaccine rollout are a concern, since racial and ethnic minority groups have been disproportionately hard-hit by the virus. 

  • Students at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health are on the frontlines of COVID-19 contact tracing in Arizona. Part of the Student Aid for Field Epidemiology Response (SAFER) program, the students investigates positive COVID-19 cases to mitigate its spread and learn more about the risk factors. "I don't think we can do this without the students who are making those calls day in and day out," said Erika Austhof, an epidemiologist at the college of public health who helps run the student call center. "They have been here hundreds and thousands of hours making calls since last March." 

  • The ongoing pandemic has given rise to a significant and alarming trend of increased alcohol use and abuse – especially among younger adults, males and those who have lost their jobs – according to a new study by University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers.

  • The University of Arizona Health Sciences is asking for volunteers that haven't had their COVID-19 vaccine yet to participate in the CDC-funded "Arizona Heroes" research study to determine vaccine effectiveness and immunity. 

  • University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers are growing batches of the new coronavirus variants in laboratories and plan to test COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness against the variants for people with compromised immune systems. UArizona immunologist Deepta Bhattacharya at the College of Medicine – Tucson and Jeff Burgess, associate dean of research at the UArizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, are interviewed.

  • Victoria Maizes, MD, professor of medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona, talks about the connection between ultra-processed foods and addiction. 

  • HCP Live - Feb. 23

    Collaboration among health care providers in the primary care setting leads to markedly better patient outcomes in patients with hypertension and diabetes, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis. Corresponding author Jeannie K. Lee of the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy noted that while interprofessional collaborative practice aligns philosophically with many of the goals of the modern health care system, there remains little thorough evidence to show its effect, if any, on patient outcomes. 

  • Saskia Popescu, an infectious disease epidemiologist and adjunct professor at the University of Arizona College of Public Health, praised the administration’s “holistic approach” to curtailing the virus. But as the rubber meets the road, Popescu said the administration faces challenges overcoming vaccine hesitancy and improving genetic sequencing to better identify mutations that could make the virus more infectious – or more deadly.

  • Experts say the number of people taking COVID-19 tests is down across Arizona. "We need testing to stay up whether or not we have a widespread or a few cases, that is when you can actually get to contact tracing," says Dr. Shad Marvasti, director of public health, prevention and health promotion at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. 

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